Textiles

The story of Hidden Land started with the fascination of the cryptic nature of textiles with their hidden semiology. Its eclectic diversity awakes a natural curiosity. We have curated a selection of fabrics, evoking a timeless style, reflecting our ideals of a modern society.
 
 
 
D H U R R I E

We selected handwoven and natural dyed Dhurries for our shopper because of their sense of contrast and timeless aesthetics. Vintage Dhurries once adorned the elegant palaces of Rajasthan, they where used as floor coverings and for meditation. 

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H A N D   B L O C K

Since the 12th century hand block printing is an Indian art form that utilizes a hand carved teak wood block that is dipped in dye and stamped by hand onto cotton. We’re impressed by the art of block printing, partly because of by the passionate artisans, who try hard on developing the art completely through natural means using vegetable dyes and natural colors for printing and preserving their workmanship by passing it over to the coming generations. 

K A N T H A   Q U I L T

Our yoga bags and a part of the backpack collection are made of Kantha Quilt. The tradition of Kantha Quilt started with the Bengali women, they recycled old saris, layer them with kantha stitch to make a sleeping blanket. In Sanskrit, the word kantha simply means rags. The unique patterns where made by women who added a poetic touch by stitching personal stories into their quilts, a process which often would take years to complete. 

B A N J A R A

The cotton Banjara fabric is produced by the Banjara traveller tribe, primarily nomadic, their name means ‘gypsy’, and though originally from the desert regions of Rajasthan, the Banjara people now live and move through 22 states in India. The Vintage Banjara we selected is used for our backpacks and made with earthy colors and geometrical design.

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M U K E S H

The rich with pattern and texture of enchanted textile Mukesh captures the color in our collection with our evening bag. This form of embroidery is labor and time intensive craft and was first developed for the royalty that resided in the city as part of their finery since Mukesh work initially used precious metals like gold and silver to make threads. In the sixtees our vintage Mukesh was used for extravagant evening dresses.